#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek Podcast Series

Topics: Store and Protect Information | Cloud Backup

Still mapping out your session plan for #ARMA2016? Preview some of the sessions by listening to these podcasts, featuring five of the ARMA Live event speakers. You'll also get some personal recommendations from the speakers for must-see attractions in San Antonio. 

#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek: Data analytics with Sue Trombley

There are numerous opportunities for records and information managers to leverage data analytics. In this podcast, Sue Trombley, Iron Mountain's Managing Director of Thought Leadership, offers some practical tips to extract more benefits from data analytics.



Transcript


Hello and welcome to the 2016 ARMA sneak peek podcast series. Leading up the 2016 ARMA Live event in San Antonio, we’re chatting with a series of speakers to hear what they’re covering in their sessions. Today, we’re talking to Sue Trombley, Managing Director of Thought Leadership at Iron Mountain about her upcoming rapid fire session on Data analytics.

How many years have you been going to ARMA? 10!

It’s not quite my golden anniversary - more like tin or aluminum!

I know last year was a big year for you, as you were inducted in as ARMA Fellow #51.

Yes, I was. I’m very proud of that.

It might be hard to top last year, but what are you most looking forward to at this year’s event?

Always look forward to and enjoy seeing colleagues and networking – there is so much to learn from each other. And, of course, at least 1 margarita!

Is there anything you’re especially interested in doing or seeing while in San Antonio?

I’ll enjoy the river walk – and at least 1 margarita! I lived in Austin for 11 years and am a UT Austin grad, so this is almost like a home-coming.

You’re hosting a rapid fire session on data analytics, Monday, Sept. 26 at 2:40. Can you tell us a little about what you’ll cover in this session?

Well, in 10 minutes I’ll be sharing what I learned about data analytics, its visualization and odd terms such as “munging” from a panel of SMEs, including faculty from the iSchool at UT Austin, software entrepreneurs and practioners.

Who should attend this session and why?

It’s meant to inform RIM professionals why data analytics is so valuable to all organizations for a variety of reasons and how they can get involved to make the process as successful as it can be - - and demonstrate their own value along the way. 50% of senior leaders say they want their RIM pros to have capabilities in data cleansing, quality, migration – there’s room at the table.

At Iron Mountain, we’re all about “M”ing the heck out of information, or managing the heck out of your information. In your opinion, how can records and information management professionals “M” or manage the heck out of data analytics?

First they have to insert themselves into the work of analytics. One of the chief complaints amongst data analysts and scientists is having to sort through information of no value – they say “get rid of what isn’t required” – this speaks directly to defensible disposition activities. Also knowing what records or data are stored where and who has access is key – along with making sure the data is accurate. I constantly hear the analysts use the old adage “garbage in, garbage out”. And, the RIM pro can help make sure privacy requirements are understood and honored. Lastly, they’ll need to be part of the conversation that determines which records need to be kept longer than their retention period for use in analytics. It’s all about an organization’s bottom line – and the RIM pro can contribute in meaningful ways by “M”ing the heck out of data and records.

Thanks again Sue for joining us. Don’t forget to mark your calendars to join Sue live on Monday, Sept. 26 at 2:40 p.m. for her rapid fire session on data analytics. See you in Texas!


#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek: Raising RIM visibility and value with Susan Cisco

RIM programs are often the first to face the budget knife. Listen as Susan Cisco, Director at Gimmal, shares some tactics to raise visibility and priority of RIM in lean times.



Transcript


Hello and welcome to the 2016 ARMA sneak peek podcast series. Leading up the 2016 ARMA Live event in San Antonio, we’re chatting with a series of speakers to hear what they’re covering in their sessions. Today, we’re talking to Susan Cisco, Director of Gimmal's Enterprise Content and Records Management Services Organization. Susan is hosting a session on Thriving in lean times: Ways to raise RIM visibility and value. Welcome Susan.

Thanks Karen. Really glad to be here with you today.

We're happy to have you here.

So, how many years have you been going to ARMA?

I would say, more than 20 years. I can't really remember missing a conference for 25 years. I always look forward to them and the ARMA conferences have taken me to places I have would not have gone to, if it weren't for ARMA. They have been a very important part of my professional development and career.

Out of all the locations you've been to, would you say one event or location was your favorite?

The one I was thinking of when I was telling you was Seattle. The conference area was near the Pike Place Market. Being outside, you always felt the ocean influence. It's a beautiful town. It was fun to be there and wouldn't have had a reason to go there if it weren't for ARMA.

For me, it's definitely the networking. One of the first events I'll attend is the Institute for certified records managers reception. The CRMs always get together early on at the conference. We have a business meeting, followed by a cocktail reception. There are several hundred in attendance and we look forward to talking to one another and catching up on what happened since last year.

I know you reside in the great state of Texas. Can you provide any guidance or recommendations for attendees who might be looking to do something in San Antonio, outside of the conference?

Absolutely. San Antonio is a very large city. I usually find myself staying down in the River Walk area. That's where attendees at the ARMA conference will be. The conference hotels are there. There is a 15 mile river walk in downtown San Antonio. There is a very touristy part around the major hotels, where it's very crowded. But if you keep walking, you'll get into quieter areas. The River Walk also has boats that go up and down the river and they have guides to tell you where you're going. The weather is good now. So a nice evening trip on one of those boats is nice. And they usually have cocktails, which is nice. So I would recommend that. In terms of restaurants, I have a particular favorite. Every time I'm in San Antonio, I go there. It's just off the River Walk. So you can walk to this place. It's called Rosario's Mexican Cafe. Street address is 910 S. Alamo. The reason I like it is because it's where the local people go. It's very authentic Mexican food, and everything is fresh and well prepared. I also found out there is a list on the ARMA conference website with restaurant's and other activities that give a discount if you show your ARMA conference badge. And I looked it up, and Rosario's is on that list. So if you take your badge with you, you'll even get a discount. And you may see me there.

Excellent. Great advice. So let me ask you. You are hosting a rapid fire discussion on Thriving in lean times: Ways to raise RIM visibility and value. It's Monday, Sept. 26 and it starts at 3:04. Can you tell us a little about what you'll be covering in this session?

I actually host a group called the eCRM Pioneers. it's a Gimmal sponsored private group of 15 companies that come together periodically to talk about the problems, challenges and best practices. In this rapidfire session, we are going to talk about 3 proven tactics, that came from the smaller group that worked in their organizations. Regardless of your industry, these are tactics that you can apply to save money and become more efficient in your operations. The first tactic is cleaning up ROT. We know that's redundant, obselete and trivial information, and I include records with expired retention periods, in that definition of ROT. So to focus on cleaning up the ROT, many organizations typically focus first on shared drives, as that's typically such a dumping ground. The second tactic is about systems and applications throughout the company that drive up licensing costs and maintenance fees. The idea is to partner with IT to identify all the systems and software applications, licensing fees and application and maintenance costs - and look to consolidating and migrating systems. The third tactic is getting ready RIM involved in mergers, acquisitions and divestitures activity. There are a lot of records and information associated with mergers, acquisitions and divestitures and there's a lots of money on the table. And RIM needs to be at that table to make sure that acquisitions and divestitures run smoothly.

At Iron Mountain, we talk a lot about “M”ing the heck out of information, or managing the heck out of your information. In your opinion, how can records and information management professionals “M” or manage the heck out of keeping RIM as a priority in these tough times?

I think the way you can manage the heck of this is to find these tactics and strategies that actually can represent to senior stakeholders the value that you can represent in terms of your abiltity to contribute to teams that speed up workflow processes and make them more high quality. A disposing of obsolete information. Get the companies attention on these very important matters of records and information, especially ROT. That's just a liability and an easy case to make. So I think the best way to manage the heck out of this is to not give up. You've got to have grit when you proceed with some of these tactics because people are very proprietary about their information. But if you can show and demonstrate how applying more rigor to processes, that in the end will save money. Lacking rigor in a process costs more than applying controls does.

Great advice.

I'd also like to call attention to our listeners to the energy industry roundtables. ARMA roundtables are scheduled for the last day of the conference, the last session. The idea being that attendees can go to sessions and network and maybe have remaining questions or learnings to share. We come together by industry to talk about the ARMA conference. We're meeting 130-330 on Tuesday, Sept. 27. The location is in your conference program. Even if you're not registered for the conference itself. If you're just registered as an exhibitor or as an exhibit attendee, you can come to this session. Hope to see you there.

Thanks again Susan for joining us. Don’t forget to mark your calendars to join Susan Monday, Sept. 26 at 4 p.m. for her live rapid fire session.


#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek: Matter mobility with Samantha Lofton

Matter mobility is the flow of information that occurs as the result of one lawyer leaving a firm and joining another. Hear from Samantha Lofton, Chief Risk and Information Officer for Ice Miller LLP, on how law firm records managers and corporate general counsel can manage the RIM and IG challenges around transferring client matter.



Transcript


Hello and welcome to the 2016 ARMA sneak peek podcast series. Leading up the 2016 ARMA Live event in San Antonio, we’re chatting with a series of speakers to hear what they’re covering in their sessions. Today, we’re talking to Samantha Lofton, the Chief Risk and Information Governance Officer at Ice Miller LLP about her upcoming session on Matters from Laterals: A Matter Mobility Workshop.

Welcome Samantha. Thanks for having me.

Let me ask you, how many years have you been going to the annual ARMA event?

I've been involved with ARMA for nearly 20 years: A former ARMA International board of director and also a former conference education chair.

So you've had a lot of experience speaking at the event and being an attendee.

Absolutely. And I understand how important education and development are to the evolving records and information management professional. And I'm honored to be able to speak at the event this year.

In terms of professional development, there are a lot of great things to get out of the event. What specifically are you looking forward to at this year's event?

I'm most looking forward to networking with colleagues, other professionals and technologists about emerging trends in information governance and records and information management. Looking at best practices and how other practitioners are using people and technology to solve the problems in IG.

On a personal level, do you plan on doing anything in San Antonio outside of the event? Any recommendations for other attendees?

I went to the ARMA conference when it was in San Antonio several years ago, and several of us went to the Alamo. We were quite surprised at the size of the Alamo. But anyone who hasn't been to San Antonio should definitely do that. The River Walk is a treat and the conference venue is very nice and accessible to all those attractions. It's very convenient for attendees to get their education and see some of San Antonio while they're there.

Out of all the past locations you've been to for the ARMA Live event, which was your favorite?

I really liked Boston. That was several years ago and they were still going through the Big Dig. But the host chapters did a great job. This was probably around 2004 or 2005.

Great to hear that. Let me ask you a little about your session. You’re hosting a panel discussion on Matters from Laterals: A Matter Mobility Workshop on Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 9:45 a.m. Can you tell us a little about what you’ll cover in this session?

So we're going to talk about matter mobility as defined in the law firm environment. The flow of information that occurs as the result of one lawyer leaving a firm and joining another; the relevant policies that should in place; the pitfalls that records and information management and IG can avoid as it relates to adherence to following policies and procedures. What firms should do as it refers to transferring data and what they should not be doing as it relates to receiving information. We're going to talk about checklists, to help attendees address physical records, personal data, electronic data contacts, email, clients and matters that are open, and what happen to matters that are closed. If a client directs all matters to be transferred - what is the responsibility of the receiving firm to close matters. Making sure that we walk through all the things that someone should be looking at or look for to make sure they're in compliance with ethics opinions, ABA rules, and the best way to mitigate risk in matter mobility. The other thing we'll talk about is where the lawyer mobility program and information governance intersect. As it relates to mobility, there are a lot of different arms of a law firm that are involved, from HR to IT to records and information management to conflicts for onboarding to the risk partners who are talking to lawyers about their responsibilities if they leave a firm. Also to the risk team that might be talking to incoming laterals about their responsibilities when they join a firm. And their responsibilities to clients as it relates to protecting their information, securing their information and ensuring that the lawyer has access to work quickly and smoothly and the client doesn't have any backlash for making the decision to leave one firm and go to another. The other thing we'll talk about is immediate steps that can be taken to protect the firm and its interest when somebody is about to leave.

Let me ask you - is this session only relevant for law firms or records managers in general?

One of the questions we plan to ask during this session is how many law firm participants are in the room and how many client, outside or general counsel participants are in the room. In-house counsel for a client would be interested once they direct their files to be moved from one law firm to another - what happens next. So a corporate client could be interested in how that process should look and what their options are if a client is working primarily with lateral A, but it's a client of the firm. Until the client tells the firm that I want to change and move with this person to their new firm, it's still a client of the firm. And what their options are: They can either go with the lateral, they could have the files returned to themselves, they could choose alternate counsel, or they might elect to stay with the firm where the lawyer is returning. It might be interesting for them to hear all the options and see how that process works with moving data and mobility within a law firm.

Last thing I wanted to ask you about. At Iron Mountain, we talk a lot about “M”ing the heck out of information, or managing the heck out of your information. Based on the session you're hosting, how can records and information management professionals “M” or manage the heck out of matter mobility.

Good records and information management practices follow ARMA's generally accepted record keeping principles. It's an excellent foundation for IG programs. Marketing the evolving skills of a records and information professional that include information asset management, that help organizations achieve objectives related to security, privacy and compliance - will definitely secure a seat at the table for the RIM professional and help them manage the heck out of data within their organization.

Thanks again Samantha for joining us. Don’t forget to mark your calendars to join Samantha live on Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 9:45 a.m. for her session on matter mobility. See you in Texas!

Thanks. Looking forward to seeing you in Texas.


#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek: IM Professionals - Don't Get Left Behind with Phil Guenther

Today’s business leaders expect more from their RIM professionals. They expect them to provide expertise around data analytics, privacy and more. Iron Mountain Senior Consultant Phil Guenther talks about how RIM professionals can leverage their skills and better showcase their value to senior leaders.



Transcript


Hello and welcome to the 2016 ARMA sneak peek podcast series. Leading up the 2016 ARMA Live event in San Antonio, we’re chatting with a series of speakers to hear what they’re covering in their sessions. Today, we’re talking to Phil Guenther, a senior consultant at Iron Mountain, about his upcoming panel discussion on IM Professionals - Don't Get Left Behind!

Welcome Phil. Thanks for having me.

So how many years have you been going to ARMA?

I believe this will be my 6th ARMA Conference. I think I took a break one year and went somewhere else, and regretted it.

This year's event is in San Antonio, which will be a lot of fun. Do you plan on getting out and doing any touring or activities while you’re in San Antonio? Any recommendations, outside the event for fellow attendees?

Well, having never been to San Antonio before, I’m really excited about checking out the River Walk area. I’ve heard such great things about it all my life, and I can’t wait to see it for myself. I’m also looking forward to some great Mexican food, and of course, some Margaritas.

Yes, that has been a theme in these conversations. So let me ask you, you are on a panel discussion on IM Professionals - Don't Get Left Behind on Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 8:30 a.m. Can you tell us a little about what you’ll cover in this session?

Well it’s a great topic – it’s all about not getting left behind in the Records and Information Management world. We all know the industry has changed a lot in the last decade or so, and it’s going to continue to keep changing. And as a result of that, the traditional role of an information management professional is changing too. This session is going to talk about how you as a RIM professional can stay relevant in your organization, and in the industry as a whole.

Some of the key learning objectives of the session will be:

  • Knowing who to partner with to facilitate your organization’s goals;
  • Starting to fill gaps that exist between your employer’s expectations and your abilities;
  • And how you can demonstrate your value to your senior leaders.

At Iron Mountain, we talk a lot about “M”ing the heck out of information management, or managing the heck out of your information management. In your opinion, how can records and information management professionals “M” or manage the heck out of how RIM professionals can continue to remain relevant in their organizations

Well I think some of the things we’re going to talk about in this session will really help with that. Demonstrating value to senior leaders is obviously a huge component, but I think another great way to stay relevant in your organization is to really understand the business. Senior leaders are looking for an information management professional who can speak the different languages of the company – IT, Legal, Information Security, etc. - and really bring these groups together to have a meaningful conversation about the organization’s goals.

Thanks again Phil for joining us. Don’t forget to mark your calendars to join Phil live on Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 8:30 a.m. for his live panel discussion. Hope to see you there.


#ARMA2016 Sneak Peek: Compliant IG with Teresa Schoch

Changes in data privacy regulations will have a significant impact on information governance. In this podcast, Iron Mountain Senior Consultant Teresa Schoch offers guidance on how to safely move data between the EU and the U.S. in the age of the Privacy Shield and the new General Data Protection Regulation.



Transcript


Hello and welcome to the 2016 ARMA sneak peek podcast series. Leading up to this year's ARMA Live event in San Antonio, we’re chatting with a series of speakers to hear what they’re covering in their sessions. Today, we’re talking to Theresa Schoch about her upcoming session on Compliant IG: Regulating data privacy within and beyond borders.

Thank you for taking the time to talk with me. Can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about what you do at Iron Mountain?

I'm a principal consultant at Iron Mountain. Just came on board a few months ago. My background is that I'm an attorney with a Masters in Library Science. There aren't too many of us. I'm also a certified records manager. I don't there are too many of us at all. I'm also certified in privacy - which I think makes me a unicorn. I'm certified in information governance and change management, and as an information professional. I get the certifications that I think I need to be good at what I want to do for Iron Mountain. I focus my credentials around trying to be able to address large global problems relating to privacy issues and how that intersects with records management.

So you're hosting a panel discussion on Compliant IG: Regulating data privacy within and beyond borders. That's Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 10:55. Can you tell our audience a little about what you'll be covering in this session?

What I'm speaking about at ARMA is the current EU Privacy laws and their impact on US corporations, in particular in regard to records management. This will require a change in the way records management is structured to be able to assume the requirements of the new EU laws. The EU has a history of being the global leader - like in environmental laws - in areas where it thinks it has the higher ethical grounds. And it imposes on itself a duty to make sure there are global laws around areas that are of particular importance and right now it is privacy. So I am going to be speaking on behalf of ILTA and the new EU law and what its impact is. I'm going to be going into the statistics of how many companies are already certified - and there aren't many. The problems with getting certified. Ongoing problems with moving the EU requirements with what are called model contracts and binding corporate rules. The EU court systems - they need to be keen on bringing fractions against US companies and will likely continue to do so. So this area is going to remain in flux for a while. That's pretty much what I'm going to be talking about.

At Iron Mountain, we talk a lot about “M”ing the heck out of information, or managing the heck out of your information. In your opinion, how can records and information management professionals “M” or manage the heck out of compliance or data privacy?

Make sure you know where it is and you control it through records management. To keep the least amount of private information that you can and make sure it is accurate and timely. And that it's a secure. Those are the big requirements. The easiest way to do that is to make sure they're records and part of the records management system and that they have special triggers and schedules, based on the kind of information they are. And that they are encrypted in place.

Is there anything you're especially interested in seeing or doing while you're in San Antonio, outside of the event?

The riverwalk is great. It's excellent. They have boat rides you can take that are fun. I had a riot on those boat rides. You can sit along the riverwalk at a restaurant and watch all the people float by. That's fun. The Alamo - you can't miss that while you're there. It's part of history. There are a lot of great stories attached to the Alamo that you might not have heard, that come to life. I also like the Bizarres. I don't know if people have time, but they have great Bizarres as they are so close to Mexico. You can get really cool, hand-painted items for practically nothing.

Thanks again Theresa for joining us. Don’t forget to mark your calendars to join Theresa and her fellow panelists Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 10:55 for the live session. See you then.